PARAMETERS MEASURED BY HEMATOLOGY ANALYZERS

Published in Hemotology
Saturday, 29 July 2017 17:54
Parameters measured by hematology analyzers and their derivation are shown in Tables 808.1 and 808.2. Most automated hematology analyzers measure red cell count, red cell indices (mean cell volume, mean cell hemoglobin, mean cell hemoglobin concentration), hemoglobin, hematocrit, total leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count (three-part or five-part), and platelet count.
 
Table 808.1 Parameters measured by hematology analyzers
Parameters measured by most analyzers Parameters measured by some analyzers
  • RBC count
  • Hemoglobin
  • Mean cell volume
  • Mean cell hemoglobin
  • Mean cell hemoglobin concentration
  • WBC count
  • WBC differential
  • Platelet count
  • Red cell distribution width
  • Reticulocyte count
  • Reticulocyte hemoglobin content
  • Mean platelet volume
  • Platelet distribution width
  • Reticulated platelets
 
Table 808.2 Parameters reported by hematology analyzers
Parameters measured directly or derived through histogram Parameters measured through calculation
  • RBC count
  • Mean cell volume (Derived from RBC histogram)
  • Red cell distribution width (Derived from RBC histogram)
  • Hemoglobin
  • Reticulocyte count
  • WBC count
  • Differential WBC count (Derived through WBC histogram)
  • Platelet count
  • Mean platelet volume (Derived from platelet histogram)
  • Hematocrit
  • Mean cell hemoglobin
  • Mean cell hemoglobin concentration
 
Estimation of Hemoglobin
 
Hemoglobin is measured directly by a modification of cyanmethemoglobin method (all hemoglobins are converted to cyanmethemoglobin by potassium ferricyanide; cyanmethemoglobin has a broad absorbance peak at 540 nm). Some analyzers use a nonhazardous reagent such as sodium lauryl sulphate. A non-ionic detergent is added for rapid red cell lysis and to minimize turbidity caused by cell membranes and plasma lipids.
 
Estimation of Red Blood Cell Count and Mean Cell Volume (MCV)
 
Red cell count and cell volume are directly measured by aperture impedance or light scatter analysis. In a red cell histogram, cell numbers are plotted on Y-axis, while cell volume is indicated on Xaxis (see Figure 808.1). The analyzer counts those cells as red cells volume of which ranges between 36 fl and 360 fl. MCV is used for morphological classification of anemia into microcytic, macrocytic, and normocytic types.
 
Figure 808.1 Diagrammatic representation of red cell histogram obtained by aperture impedance
Figure 808.1 Diagrammatic representation of red cell histogram obtained by aperture impedance. The analyzer counts cells between 36 fl and 360 fl as red cells. Although leukocytes are present and counted along with red cells in the diluting fluid, their number is not statistically significant. Only if leukocyte count is markedly elevated (>50,000/μl), histogram and the red cell count will be affected. Area of the peak between 60 fl and 125 fl is used for calculation of mean cell volume and red cell distribution width. Abnormalities in red cell histogram include: (1) Left shift of the curve in microcytosis, (2) Right shift of the curve in macrocytosis, and (3) Bimodal peak of the curve in double (dimorphic) population of red cells
 
Estimation of MCH, MCHC, and Hematocrit (HCT/PCV)
 
These parameters are obtained indirectly through calculations.
 
 
MCH (pg) = Hemoglobin (g/l)
                     RBC count (10⁶/μl)
 
 
MCHC (g/dl) = Hemoglobin (g/dl)
                         Hematocrit (%)
 
 
Hematocrit (%) = Mean Cell Volume (fl)
                              RBC count (10⁶/μl)
 
 
Estimation of Red Cell Distribution Width (RDW)
 
RDW is a quantitative measure of variation in sizes of red cells and is expressed as coefficient of variation of red cell size distribution. It is equivalent to anisocytosis observed on blood smear. It is derived from red cell histogram in some analyzers. RDW is usually elevated in iron deficiency anemia, but not in β-thalassemia minor and anemia of chronic disease (other causes of microcytic anemia). However, this distinction is not absolute and there is a significant overlap between values among patients. Raised RDW requires examination of blood smear.
 
Among the red cell values generated by the analyzer (red cell count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCV, MCH, MCHC, and RDW), most important for decision-making are hemoglobin, hematocrit, and MCV.
 
WBC Differential
 
Difference between 3-part and 5-part hemotology analyzer...
 
Hematology analyzers can either generate a 3-part differential (differential count reported as lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes) or a 5-part differential (lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils). The 3-part differential counting is based on electrical impedance volume measurement of leukocytes. In volume histogram for WBCs, approximate numbers of cells are plotted on Y-axis and cell size on X-axis. Those cells with volume 35-90 fl are designated as lymphocytes, cells with volume 90-160 fl as mononuclear cells, and cells with volume 160-450 fl as neutrophils (see Figure 808.2). Any deviation from the expected histogram is flagged by the analyzer, mandating review of blood smear. A large proportion of 3-part differential counts are ‘flagged’ to avoid missing abnormal cells.
 
Instruments measuring a 5-part differential work on a combination of different principles, e.g. light scatter, impedance, and electrical conductivity, a combination of light scatter, peroxidase staining, and resistance of basophils to lysis in acid buffer, etc.
 
Figure 808.2 Diagrammatic representation of WBC histogram
Figure 808.2 Diagrammatic representation of WBC histogram. WBC histogram analysis shows relative numbers of cells on Y-axis and cell size on X-axis. The lytic agent lyses the cytoplasm that collapses around the nucleus causing differential shrinkage. The analyzer sorts the WBCs according to the nuclear size into 3 main groups (3-part differential): Cells with 35-90 fl volume are designated as lymphocytes, cells with 90-160 fl volume are designated as monocytes, and cells with 160-450 fl volume are designated as neutrophils. Abnormalities in WBC histogram include: (1) Peak to the left of lymphocyte peak: Nucleated red cells, (2) Peak between lymphocytes and monocytes: Blast cells, eosinophilia, basophilia, plasma cells, and atypical lymphocytes, and (3) Peak between monocytes and neutrophils: Left shift
 
Platelet Count
 
Platelets are difficult to count because of their small size, marked variation in size, tendency to aggregation, and overlapping of size with microcytic red cells, cellular fragments, and other debris. In hematology analyzers, this difficulty is addressed by mathematical analysis of platelet volume distribution so that it corresponds to lognormal distribution. Platelets are counted by electrical impedance method in the RBC aperture, and a histogram is generated with platelet volume on X-axis and relative cell frequency on Y-axis (see Figure 808.3). Normal platelet histogram consists of a right-skewed single peak. Particles greater than 2 fl and less than 20 fl are classified as platelets by the analyzer.
 
Figure 808.3 Diagrammatic representation of normal platelet histogram
Figure 808.3 Diagrammatic representation of normal platelet histogram: Counting and sizing of platelets by electrical impedance method occurs in the RBC aperture. The counter designates particles between sizes 2 fl and 20 fl as platelets. Abnormalities in platelet histogram result from interferences such as cytoplasmic fragments (peak at left end of histogram) or severely microcytic red cells and giant platelets (peak at right end of histogram)
 
Two other platelet parameters can be obtained from platelet histogram using computer technology: mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW). Some analyzers can generate another parameter called as reticulated platelets.
 
MPV refers to the average size of platelets and is obtained from mathematical calculation. Normal MPV is 7-10 fl. Increased MPV (> 10 fl) results from presence of immature platelets in circulation; peripheral destruction of platelets stimulates megakaryocytes to produce such platelets (e.g. in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura). Decreased MPV (< 7 fl) is due to presence of small platelets in circulation (in conditions associated with reduced production of platelets in bone marrow).
 
PDW is analogous to RDW and is a measure of variation in size of platelets (normal <20%). Increased PDW is observed in megaloblastic anemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and after chemotherapy.
 
Some analyzers measure reticulated platelets or young platelets that contain RNA (similar to reticulocytes). Increased numbers of reticulated platelets are seen in thrombocytopenia due to peripheral destruction of platelets.

Reticulocyte Count
 
Various fluorescent dyes can combine with RNA of reticulocytes; the fluorescence then is counted in a flow cytometer. More immature reticulocytes fluoresce more strongly as they contain more RNA.
 
Reticulocyte hemoglobin content is a parameter that estimates hemoglobinization of most recently produced red cells. It is a predictor of iron deficiency.
 
WBC Cytogram (Scattergram)
 
In the scattergram, each dot represents a cell of a given volume and density, and the positions of dots in the graph are determined by the degree of side scatter, degree of forward scatter, light absorption by the cell, and cytochemical staining (if used). The forward angle light scatter (FALS) is represented on Y-axis, and the side scatter (SS) is represented on X-axis. Low FALS and low SS are indicative of lymphocytes; with subsequent increasing FALS and SS, monocytes, neutrophils, and lastly eosinophils are designated in the graph. Counting of basophils is based on a different technology.
 
Further Reading:
 

FLOW CYTOMETRY

Published in Hemotology
Saturday, 29 July 2017 15:37
FLOW CYTOMETRY
 
Box 807.1 Properties of a cell measured by a flow cytometerFlow cytometry is a procedure used for measuring multiple cellular and fluorescent properties of cells when they flow as a single cell suspension through a laser beam by a specialized instrument called as a flow cytometer. Flow cytometry can analyze numerous cells in a short time and multiple parameters of a single cell can be analyzed simultaneously. From the measured parameters, specific cell populations are defined. Cells or particles with size 0.2-150 μm are suitable for flow cytometer analysis.
 
Flow cytometry can provide following information about a cell (Box 807.1):
 
  • Cell size (forward scatter)
  • Internal complexity or granularity (side scatter)
  • Relative fluorescence intensity.
 
A flow cytometer consists of three main components or systems: fluidics, optics, and electronics.
 
(1) Fluidics: The function of the fluidics system is to transport cells in a stream to the laser beam for interrogation. Cells (fluorescence-tagged) are introduced into the cytometer (injected into the sheath fluid within the flow chamber) and made to flow in a single file past a laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) beam. The stream transporting the cells should be positioned in the center of the laser beam. The portion of the fluid stream where the cells are located is called as the sample core. Only a single cell or particle should pass through the laser beam at one time. Flow cytometers use the principle of hydrodynamic focusing (process of centering the sample core within the sheath fluid) for presenting cells to the laser.
 
(2) Optics: This system consists of lasers for illumination of cells in the sample, and filters to direct the generated light signals to the appropriate detectors.
 
The light source used in most flow cytometers is laser.
 
The laser most commonly used in flow cytometry is Argon-ion laser. The light signals are generated when the laser beam strikes the cell, which are then collected by appropriately positioned lenses. A system of optical mirrors and filters then directs the specified wavelengths of light to the designated detectors. Two types of light signals are generated when the laser beam strikes cells tagged with fluorescent molecules: fluorescence and light scatter. The cells tagged with fluorescence emit a momentary pulse of fluorescence; in addition, two types of light scatter are measured: forward scatter (proportional to cell diameter) and side scatter (proportional to granularity of cell).
 
(3) Electronics: The optical signals (photons) are converted to corresponding electronic signals (electrons) by the photodetectors (photodiodes and photomultiplier tubes). The electronic signal produced is proportional to the amount of light striking a cell. The electric current travels to the amplifier and is converted to a voltage pulse. The voltage pulse is assigned a digital value representing a channel by the Analog-to Digital Converter (ADC). The channel number is then transferred to the computer which displays it to the appropriate position on the data plot.
 
Further Reading:
 

COMMON APPLICATIONS OF FLOW CYTOMETRY IN HEMATOLOGY

Published in Hemotology
Friday, 28 July 2017 17:59
  1. Leukemias and lympomas: Immunophenotyping (evaluation of cell surface markers), diagnosis, detection of minimal residual disease, and to identify prognostically important subgroups.
  2. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: Deficiency of CD 55 and CD 59.
  3. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Enumeration of CD34+ stem cells.
  4. Feto-maternal hemorrhage: Detection and quantitation of foetal hemoglobin in maternal blood sample.
  5. Anemias: Reticulocyte count.
  6. Human immunodeficiency virus infection: For enumeration of CD4+ lymphocytes.
  7. Histocompatibility cross matching.

PLATELET AGGREGATION STUDIES

Published in Hemotology
Friday, 28 July 2017 10:05
Platelet aggregation tests are carried out in specialized hematology laboratories if platelet dysfunction is suspected. These tests are usually indicated in patients presenting with mucocutaneous type of bleeding and in whom screening tests reveal normal platelet count, prolonged bleeding time, normal prothrombin time, and normal activated partial thromboplastin time. Platelet aggregation studies are carried out on platelet-rich plasma using aggregometer. When a platelet aggregating agent is added to platelet-rich plasma, platelets form aggregates and optical density falls (or light transmission increases); this is recorded by a chart recorder on a strip chart. Commonly used platelet aggregating agents are ADP (adenosine 5-diphosphate), epinephrine (adrenaline), collagen, arachidonic acid, and ristocetin. ADP (low dose) and epinephrine induce primary and secondary waves of aggregation (biphasic curve). Primary wave is due to the direct action of aggregating agent on platelets. Secondary wave is due to thromboxane A2 synthesis and secretion from platelets. Collagen, arachidonic acid and ristocetin induce a single wave of aggregation (monophasic curve) Normal aggregation curve is shown in Figure 804.1. Aggregation patterns in various platelet function defects are shown in Figures 804.2 to 804.4, and in Table 804.1.
 
Figure 804.1 Normal platelet aggregation curves
Figure 804.1 Normal platelet aggregation curves
 
Figure 804.2 Platelet aggregation curves in von Willebrand disease and Bernard Soulier syndrome absent aggregation with ristocetin normal aggregation with ADP epinephrine and arachidonic acid
Figure 804.2 Platelet aggregation curves in von Willebrand disease and Bernard-Soulier syndrome (absent aggregation with ristocetin, normal aggregation with ADP, epinephrine, and arachidonic acid)
 
Figure 804.3 Platelet aggregation curves in storage pool defect absent second wave of aggregation with ADP and epinephrine absent or greatly diminished aggregation with collagen and normal ristocetin aggregation
Figure 804.3 Platelet aggregation curves in storage pool defect (absent second wave of aggregation with ADP and epinephrine, absent or greatly diminished aggregation with collagen, and normal ristocetin aggregation)
 
Figure 804.4 Platelet aggregation curves in Glanzmanns thrombasthenia absent aggregation with all agonists except ristocetin
Figure 804.4 Platelet aggregation curves in Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia (absent aggregation with all agonists except ristocetin)

EXAMINATION OF BLOOD SMEAR

Published in Hemotology
Thursday, 27 July 2017 11:22
A blood smear is examined for:
 
 
A peripheral blood smear has three parts: Head, body, and tail. Also read: PREPARATION OF BLOOD SMEAR BY WEDGE METHOD.
 
A blood smear should be examined in an orderly manner. Initially, blood smear should be observed under low power objective (10×) to assess whether the film is properly spread and stained, to assess cell distribution, and to select an area for examination of blood cells. Best morphologic details are seen in the area where red cells are just touching one another. Low power view is also helpful for the identification of Rouleaux formation, autoagglutination of red cells, and microfilaria. High power objective (45×) is suitable for examination of red cell morphology and for differential leukocyte count. A rough estimate of total leukocyte count can be obtained which also serves to crosscheck the total leukocyte count done by manual counting or automated method. Oil-immersion objective (100×) is used for more detailed examination of any abnormal cells.
 
Further Reading:
 

MORPHOLOGY OF PLATELETS

Published in Hemotology
Wednesday, 26 July 2017 17:45
Box 802.1 Role of blood smear in thrombocytopeniaPlatelets are small, 1-3 μm in diameter, purple structures with tiny irregular projections on surface. In blood films prepared from non-anticoagulated blood (i.e. direct fingerstick), they occur in clumps. If platelet count is done on automated blood cell counters using EDTA-anticoagulated blood sample, about 1% of persons show falsely low count due to the presence in them of EDTA dependent antiplatelet antibody. Examination of a parallel blood film is useful in avoiding the false diagnosis of thrombocytopenia in such cases. Occasionally, platelets show rosetting around neutrophils (platelet satellitism) (see Figure 802.1). This is seen in patients with platelet antibodies and in apparently normal persons. Blood smear examination can be helpful in determining underlying cause of thrombocytopenia such as leukemia, lymphoma, or microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (Box 802.1).
 
Also Read:
 

NUMERICAL ABNORMALITIES OF LEUKOCYTES

Published in Hemotology
Wednesday, 26 July 2017 16:28
For meaningful interpretation, absolute count of leukocytes should be reported. These are obtained as follows:
 
Absolute Leukocyte Count = Leukocyte% × Total Leukocyte Count/ml
 
 
Neutrophilia:
 
An absolute neutrophil count greater than 7500/μl is termed as neutrophilia or neutrophilic leukocytosis.
 
Causes
 
  1. Acute bacterial infections: Abscess, pneumonia, meningitis, septicemia, acute rheumatic fever, urinary tract infection.
  2. Tissue necrosis: Burns, injury, myocardial infarction.
  3. Acute blood loss
  4. Acute hemorrhage
  5. Myeloproliferative disorders
  6. Metabolic disorders: Uremia, acidosis, gout
  7. Poisoning
  8. Malignant tumors
  9. Physiologic causes: Exercise, labor, pregnancy, emotional stress.
 
Leukemoid reaction: This refers to the presence of markedly increased total leukocyte count (>50,000/cmm) with immature cells in peripheral blood resembling leukaemia but occurring in non-leukemic disorders (see Figure 801.2). Its causes are:
 
  • Severe bacterial infections, e.g. septicemia, pneumonia
  • Severe hemorrhage
  • Severe acute hemolysis
  • Poisoning
  • Burns
  • Carcinoma metastatic to bone marrow Leukemoid reaction should be differentiated from chronic myeloid leukemia (Table 801.1).
 
Table 801.1 Differences between leukemoid reaction and leukemia
Table 801.1 Differences between leukemoid reaction and leukemia
 
Figure 801.2 Leukemoid reaction in blood smear
Figure 801.2 Leukemoid reaction in blood smear
 
 
Absolute neutrophil count less than 2000/μl is neutropenia. It is graded as mild (2000-1000/μl), moderate (1000-500/μl), and severe (< 500/μl).
 
Causes
 
I. Decreased or ineffective production in bone marrow:
 
  1. Infections 
    (a) Bacterial: typhoid, paratyphoid, miliary tuberculosis, septicemia
    (b) Viral: influenza, measles, rubella, infectious mononucleosis, infective hepatitis.
    (c) Protozoal: malaria, kala azar
    (d) Overwhelming infection by any organism
  2. Hematologic disorders: megaloblastic anemia, aplastic anemia, aleukemic leukemia, myelophthisis.
  3. Drugs:
    (a) Idiosyncratic action: Analgesics, antibiotics, sulfonamides, phenothiazines, antithyroid drugs, anticonvulsants.
    (b) Dose-related: Anticancer drugs
  4. Ionizing radiation
  5. Congenital disorders: Kostman's syndrome, cyclic neutropenia, reticular dysgenesis.
 
II. Increased destruction in peripheral blood:
 
  1. Neonatal isoimmune neutropaenia
  2. Systemic lupus erythematosus
  3. Felty's syndrome
 
III. Increased sequestration in spleen:
 
  1. Hypersplenism
 
Eosinophilia:
 
This refers to absolute eosinophil count greater than 600/μl.
 
Causes
 
  1. Allergic diseases: Bronchial asthma, rhinitis, urticaria, drugs.
  2. Skin diseases: Eczema, pemphigus, dermatitis herpetiformis.
  3. Parasitic infection with tissue invasion: Filariasis, trichinosis, echinococcosis.
  4. Hematologic disorders: Chronic Myeloproliferative disorders, Hodgkin's disease, peripheral T cell lymphoma.
  5. Carcinoma with necrosis.
  6. Radiation therapy.
  7. Lung diseases: Loeffler's syndrome, tropical eosinophilia
  8. Hypereosinophilic syndrome.
 
Basophilia:
 
Increased numbers of basophils in blood (>100/μl) occurs in chronic myeloid leukemia, polycythemia vera, idiopathic myelofibrosis, basophilic leukemia, myxedema, and hypersensitivity to food or drugs.
 
Monocytosis:
 
This is an increase in the absolute monocyte count above 1000/μl.
 
Causes
 
  1. Infections: Tuberculosis, subacute bacterial endocarditis, malaria, kala azar.
  2. Recovery from neutropenia.
  3. Autoimmune disorders.
  4. Hematologic diseases: Myeloproliferative disorders, monocytic leukemia, Hodgkin's disease.
  5. Others: Chronic ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, sarcoidosis.
 
Lymphocytosis:
 
Box 801.1 Differential diagnosis of LymphocytosisThis is an increase in absolute lymphocyte count above upper limit of normal for age (4000/μl in adults, >7200/μl in adolescents, >9000/μl in children and infants) (Box 801.1).
 
Causes
 
  1. Infections: 
    (a) Viral: Acute infectious lymphocytosis, infective hepatitis, cytomegalovirus, mumps, rubella, varicella
    (b) Bacterial: Pertussis, tuberculosis
    (c) Protozoal: Toxoplasmosis
  2. Hematological disorders: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, lymphoma.
  3. Other: Serum sickness, post-vaccination, drug reactions.

WHITE BLOOD CELLS MORPHOLOGY

Published in Hemotology
Wednesday, 26 July 2017 13:33
Approximate idea about total leukocyte count can be gained from the examination of the smear under high power objective (40× or 45×). A differential leukocyte count should be carried out. Abnormal appearing white cells are evaluated under oil-immersion objective.
 
Morphology of normal leukocytes (see Figure 800.1):
 
  1. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil: Neutrophil measures 14-15 μm in size. Its cytoplasm is colorless or lightly eosinophilic and contains multiple, small, fine, mauve granules. Nucleus has 2-5 lobes that are connected by fine chromatin strands. Nuclear chromatin is condensed and stains deep purple in color. A segmented neutrophil has at least 2 lobes connected by a chromatin strand. A band neutrophil shows non-segmented U-shaped nucleus of even width. Normally band neutrophils comprise less than 3% of all leukocytes. Majority of neutrophils have 3 lobes, while less than 5% have 5 lobes. In females, 2-3% of neutrophils show a small projection (called drumstick) on the nuclear lobe. It represents one inactivated X chromosome.
  2. Eosinophil: Eosinophils are slightly larger than neutrophils (15-16 μm). The nucleus is often bilobed and the cytoplasm is packed with numerous, large, bright orange-red granules. On blood smears, some of the eosinophils are often ruptured.
  3. Basophils: Basophils are seen rarely on normal smears. They are small (9-12 μm), round to oval cells, which contain very large, coarse, deep purple granules. It is difficult to make out the nucleus since granules cover it.
  4. Monocytes: Monocyte is the largest of the leukocytes (15-20 μm). It is irregular in shape, with oval or clefted (kidney-shaped) nucleus and fine, delicate chromatin. Cytoplasm is abundant, bluegray with ground glass appearance and often contains fine azurophil granules and vacuoles. After migration to the tissues from blood, they are called as macrophages.
  5. Lymphocytes: On peripheral blood smear, two types of lymphocytes are distinguished: small and large. The majority of lymphocytes are small (7-8 μm). These cells have a high nuclearcytoplasmic ratio with a thin rim of deep blue cytoplasm. The nucleus is round or slightly clefted with coarsely clumped chromatin. Large lymphocytes (10-15 μm) have a more abundant, pale blue cytoplasm, which may contain a few azurophil granules. Nucleus is oval or round and often placed on one side of the cell.
 
Figure 800.1 Normal mature white blood cells in peripheral blood
Figure 800.1 Normal mature white blood cells in peripheral blood
 
Morphology of abnormal leukocytes:
 
  1. Box 800.1 Role of blood smear in leukemiaToxic granules: These are darkly staining, bluepurple, coarse granules in the cytoplasm of neutrophils. They are commonly seen in severe bacterial infections.
  2. Döhle inclusion bodies: These are small, oval, pale blue cytoplasmic inclusions in the periphery of neutrophils. They represent remnants of ribosomes and rough endoplasmic reticulum. They are often associated with toxic granules and are seen in bacterial infections.
  3. Cytoplasmic vacuoles: Vacuoles in neutrophils are indicative of phagocytosis and are seen in bacterial infections.
  4. Shift to left of neutrophils: This refers to presence of immature cells of neutrophil series (band forms and metamyelocytes) in peripheral blood and occurs in infections and inflammatory disorders.
  5. Hypersegmented neutrophils: Hypersegmentation of neutrophils is said to be present when >5% of neutrophils have 5 or more lobes. They are large in size and are also called as macropolycytes. They are seen in folate or vitamin B12 deficiency and represent one of the earliest signs.
  6. Pelger-Huet cells: In Pelger-Huet anomaly (a benign autosomal dominant condition), there is failure of nuclear segmentation of granulocytes so that nuclei are rod-like, round, or have two segments. Such granulocytes are also observed in myeloproliferative disorders (pseudo-Pelger-Huet cells).
  7. Atypical lymphocytes: These are seen in viral infections, especially infectious mononucleosis. Atypical lymphocytes are large, irregularly shaped lymphocytes with abundant cytoplasm and irregular nuclei. Cytoplasm shows deep basophilia at the edges and scalloping of borders. Nuclear chromatin is less dense and occasional nucleolus may be present.
  8. Blast cells: These are most premature of the leukocytes. They are large (15-25 μm), round to oval cells, with high nuclear cytoplasmic ratio. Nucleus shows one or more nucleoli and nuclear chromatin is immature. These cells are seen in severe infections, infiltrative disorders, and leukemia. In leukemia and lymphoma, blood smear suggests the diagnosis or differential diagnosis and helps in ordering further tests (see Figure 800.2 and Box 800.1).
 
Figure 800.2 Morphological abnormalities of white blood cells
Figure 800.2 Morphological abnormalities of white blood cells: (A) Toxic granules; (B) Döhle inclusion body; (C) Shift to left in neutrophil series; (D) Hypersegmented neutrophil in megaloblastic anemia; (E) Atypical lymphocyte in infectious mononucleosis; (F) Blast cell in acute leukemia
 
Further Reading:
 

RED CELLS MORPHOLOGY

Published in Hemotology
Tuesday, 25 July 2017 18:19
Role of blood smear in anemiasRed cells are best examined in an area where they are just touching one another (towards the tail of the film). Normal red cells are 7-8 μm in size, round with smooth contours, and stain deep pink at the periphery and paler in the center. Area of central pallor is about 1/3rd the diameter of the red cell. Size of a normal red cell corresponds roughly with the size of the nucleus of a small lymphocyte. Normal red cells are described as normocytic (of normal size) and normochromic (with normal staining intensity i.e. hemoglobin content).
 
Morphologic abnormalities of red cells in peripheral blood smear can be grouped as follows:
 
  • Red cells with abnormal size (see Figure 799.1)
  • Red cells with abnormal staining
  • Red cells with abnormal shape (see Figure 799.1)
  • Red cell inclusions (see Figure 799.2)
  • Immature red cells (see Figure799.3)
  • Abnormal red cell arrangement(see Figure 799.4).
 
Red cells with abnormal size:
 
Mild variation in red cell size is normal. Increased variation in red cell size is called as anisocytosis. This is a feature of most anemias and is non-specific. Anisocytosis is due to the presence of microcytes, macrocytes, or both in addition to red cells of normal size.
 
Microcytes are red cells smaller in size than normal. They are seen when hemoglobin synthesis is defective i.e. in iron deficiency anemia, thalassemias, anemia of chronic disease, and sideroblastic anemia.

Macrocytes are red cells larger in size than normal. Oval macrocytes (macro-ovalocytes) are seen in megaloblastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and in patients being treated with cancer chemotherapy. Round macrocytes are seen in liver disease, alcoholism, and hypothyroidism.
 
Red cells with abnormal staining (hemoglobin content):

Staining intensity of red cells depends on hemoglobin content. Red cells with increased area of central pallor (i.e. containing less hemoglobin) are called as hypochromic. They are seen when hemoglobin synthesis is defective, i.e. in iron deficiency, thalassemias, anaemia of chronic disease, and sideroblastic anemia.
 
In dimorphic anemia, there are two distinct populations of red cells in the same smear. An example is presence of both normochromic and hypochromic red cells seen in sideroblastic anemia, iron deficiency anemia responding to treatment, and following blood transfusion in a patient of hypochromic anemia. In myelodysplastic syndrome, dimorphic picture results from admixture of microcytic hypochromic cells and macrocytes.
 
Red cells with abnormal shape:
 
Increased variation in red cell shape is called as poikilocytosis and is a feature of many anemias. A red cell that is abnormal in shape is called as a poikilocyte.
 
Sickle cells are narrow and elongated red cells with one or both ends pointed. Sickle form is assumed when a red cell containing hemoglobin S is deprived of oxygen. Sickle cells are seen in sickle cell disorders, particularly sickle cell anemia. Sickle cells are not seen on blood smear in neonates with sickle cell disease because high percentage of fetal hemoglobin in red cells prevents sickling.
 
Spherocytes are red cells, which are slightly smaller in size than normal, round, stain intensely, and do not have central area of pallor. The surface area of spherocytes is less as compared to the volume. They are seen in hereditary spherocytosis, autoimmune hemolytic anemia (warm antibody type), and ABO hemolytic disease of newborn.
 
Schistocytes are fragmented red cells, which take various forms like helmet, crescent, triangle, etc. and usually have surface projections or spicules. They are seen in microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, cardiac valve prosthesis, and severe burns.
 
Target cells are red cells with bull's eye appearance. These red cells show a central stained area and a peripheral stained rim with unstained cytoplasm in between. They are seen in hemoglobinopathies (e.g. thalassemias, hemoglobin disease, sickle cell disease), obstructive jaundice, and following splenectomy.disease, sickle cell disease), obstructive jaundice, and following splenectomy.
 
Burr cells or echinocytes are small red cells with regularly placed small projections on surface. They are seen in uremia.
 
Acanthocytes are red cells with irregularly spaced sharp projections of variable length on surface. They are seen in spur cell anemia of liver disease, McLeod phenotype, and following splenectomy.
 
Teardrop cells or dacryocytes have a tapering droplike shape. Numerous teardrop red cells are seen in myelofibrosis and myelophthisic anemia.
 
Blister cells or hemi ghost cells are irregularly contracted cells in which hemoglobin is contracted and condensed away from the cell membrane. This is seen in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase defici-ency during acute hemolytic episode.
 
Bite cells result from removal of Heinz bodies by the pitting action of the spleen (i.e. a part of red cell is bitten off by the splenic macrophages). They are seen in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogena-se deficiency and unstable hemoglobin disease.
 
Red cell inclusions:
 
Those inclusions that can be visualized on Romanowsky-stained smears are basophilic stippling, Howell-Jolly bodies, Pappenheimer bodies, and Cabot's rings.

Basophilic stippling or punctate basophilia refers to the presence of numerous, irregular basophilic (purple-blue) granules which are uniformly distributed in the red cell. These granules represent aggregates of ribosomes. Their presence is indicative of impaired erythropoiesis and they are seen in thalassemias, megaloblastic anemia, heavy metal poisoning (e.g. lead), and liver disease.cell. These granules represent aggregates of ribosomes. Their presence is indicative of impaired erythropoiesis and they are seen in thalassemias, megaloblastic anemia, heavy metal poisoning (e.g. lead), and liver disease.
 
Red cell inclusions
Figure 799.2 Red cell inclusions: (A) Basophilic stippling; (B) Howell-Jolly bodies; (C) Pappenheimer bodies; (D) Cabot’s ring
 
Howell-Jolly bodies are small, round, purple-staining nuclear remnants located peripherally in red cells. They are seen in megaloblastic anemia, thalasse-mias, hemolytic anemia, and following splenectomy.

Pappenheimer bodies are basophilic, small, ironcontaining granules in red cells. They give positive Perl's Prussian blue reaction. Unlike basophilic stippling, Pappenheimer bodies are few in number and are not distributed throughout the red cell. They are seen following splenectomy and in thalassemias and sideroblastic anemia.

Cabot's rings are fine, reddish-purple or red, ring-like structures. They appear like loops or figure of eight structures. They indicate impaired erythropoiesis and are seen in megaloblastic anemia and lead poisoning.
 
Immature red cells:
 
Polychromatic cells are young red cells containing remnants of ribonucleic acid. These cells are slightly larger than normal red cells and have a diffuse bluishgrey tint. (They represent reticulocytes when stained with a supravital stain like new methylene blue). Polychromasia is due to the uptake of acid stain by hemoglobin and basic stain by ribonucleic acid. Presence of polychromatic cells is indicative of active erythropoiesis and are increased in hemolytic anemia, acute blood loss, and following specific therapy for nutritional anemia.and are increased in hemolytic anemia, acute blood loss, and following specific therapy for nutritional anemia.
 
Nucleated red cells are red cell precursors (erythroblasts), which are released prematurely in peripheral blood from the bone marrow. They are a normal finding in cord blood of newborns. Large number of nucleated red cells in blood smear is seen in hemolytic disease of newborn, hemolytic anemia, leukemias, myelophthisic anemia, and myelofibrosis.
 
Immature red cells
Figure 799.3 Immature red cells: (A) Polychromatic red cell; (B) Nucleated red cell
 
Abnormal red cell arrangement:
 
Rouleaux formation refers to alignment of red cells on top of each other like a stack of coins. It occurs in multiple myeloma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, hypergammaglobulinemia, and hyper fibrinogenemia.
 
Abnormal red cell arrangement
Figure 799.4 Abnormal red cell arrangement: (A) Rouleaux formation; (B) Autoagglutination

Autoagglutination refers to the clumping of red cells in large, irregular groups on blood smear. It is seen in cold agglutinin disease. Role of blood smear in anemia is shown in Box 799.1 and Figures 799.5 to 799.7.
 
Figure 799.5 Differential diagnosis of macrocytic anemia on blood smear
Figure 799.5 Differential diagnosis of macrocytic anemia on blood smear: (A) Megaloblastic anemia; (B) Hemolytic anemia; (C) Liver disease; (D) Myelodysplastic syndrome
 
Figure 799.6 Differential diagnosis of microcytic anemia on blood smear
Figure 799.6 Differential diagnosis of microcytic anemia on blood smear: (A) Iron deficiency anemia; (B) Thalassemia minor; (C) Thalassemia major; (D) Sideroblastic anemia
 
Figure 799.7 Differential diagnosis of hemolytic anemia on blood smear
Figure 799.7 Differential diagnosis of hemolytic anemia on blood smear. (A) Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia showing fragmented red cells, (B) Hereditary spherocytosis showing spherocytes and a polychromatic red cell, and (C) Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency showing a blister cell and a bite cell
 
Further Reading:
 

PARTS AND FUNCTIONS OF A COMPOUND MICROSCOPE

Published in Microbiology
Tuesday, 25 July 2017 15:42
The microscope is the most important piece of equipment in the clinic laboratory. The microscope is used to review fecal, urine, blood, and cytology samples on a daily basis (see Figure). Understanding how the microscope functions, how it operates, and how to care for it will improve the reliability of your results and prolong the life of this valuable piece of equipment.

Parts and functions of a compound microscope

Compound Microscope(A) Arm: Used to carry the microscope.
 
(B) Base: Supports the microscope and houses the light source.
 
(C) Oculars (or eyepieces): The lens of the microscope you look through. The ocular also magnifies the image. The total magnification can be calculated by multiplying the objective power by the ocular power. Oculars come in different magnifications, but 10× magnification is common.
 
(D) Diopter adjustment: The purpose of the diopter adjustment is to correct the differences in vision an individual may have between their left and right eyes.
 
(E) Interpupillary adjustment: This allows the oculars to move closer or further away from one another to match the width of an individual’s eyes. When looking through the microscope, one should see only a single field of view. When viewing a sample, always use both eyes. Using one eye can cause eye strain over a period of time.
 
(F) Nosepiece: The nosepiece holds the objective lenses. The objectives are mounted on a rotating turret so they can be moved into place as needed. Most nosepieces can hold up to five objectives.
 
(G) Objective lenses: The objective lens is the lens closest to the object being viewed, and its function is to magnify it. Objective lenses are available in many powers, but 4×, 10×, 40×, and 100× are standard. 4× objective is used mainly for scanning. 10× objective is considered “low power,” 40× is “high power” and 100× objective is referred to as “oil immersion.” Once magnified by the objective lens, the image is viewed through the oculars, which magnify it further. Total magnification can be calculated by multiplying the objective power by the ocular lens power.
 
For example: 100× objective lens with 10× oculars = 1000× total magnification.
 
(H) Stage: The platform on which the slide or object is placed for viewing.
 
(I) Stage brackets: Spring-loaded brackets, or clips, hold the slide or specimen in place on the stage.
 
(J) Stage control knobs: Located just below the stage are the stage control knobs. These knobs move the slide or specimen either horizontally (x-axis) or vertically (y-axis) when it is being viewed.
 
(K) Condenser: The condenser is located under the stage. As light travels from the illuminator, it passes through the condenser, where it is focused and directed at the specimen.
 
(L) Condenser control knob: Allows the condenser to be raised or lowered.
 
(M) Condenser centering screws: These crews center the condenser, and therefore the beam of light. Generally, they do not need much adjustment unless the microscope is moved or transported frequently.
 
(N) Iris diaphragm: This structure controls the amount of light that reaches the specimen. Opening and closing the iris diaphragm adjusts the diameter of the light beam.
 
(O) Coarse and fine focus adjustment knobs: These knobs bring the object into focus by raising and lowering the stage. Care should be taken when adjusting the stage height. When a higher power objective is in place (100× objective for example), there is a risk of raising the stage and slide and hitting the objective lens. This can break the slide and scratch the lens surface. Coarse adjustment is used for finding focus under low power and adjusting the stage height. Fine adjustment is used for more delicate, high power adjustment that would require fine tuning.
 
(P) Illuminator: The illuminator is the light source for the microscope, usually situated in the base. The brightness of the light from the illuminator can be adjusted to suit your preference and the object you are viewing.
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