PHYSICAL EXAMINATION OF URINE

Published in Clinical Pathology
Saturday, 05 August 2017 17:22
The parameters to be examined on physical examination of urine are listed below.
 
  • Volume
  • Color
  • Appearance
  • Odor
  • Specific Gravity
  • pH
 
VOLUME
 
Volume of only the 24-hr specimen of urine needs to be measured and reported. The average 24-hr urinary output in adults is 600-2000 ml. The volume varies according to fluid intake, diet, and climate. Abnormalities of urinary volume are as follows:
 
  • Polyuria means urinary volume > 2000 ml/24 hours. This is seen in diabetes mellitus (osmotic diuresis), diabetes insipidus (failure of secretion of antidiuretic hormone), chronic renal failure (loss of concentrating ability of kidneys) or diuretic therapy.
  • Oliguria means urinary volume < 400 ml/24 hours. Causes include febrile states, acute glomerulonephritis (decreased glomerular filtration), congestive cardiac failure or dehydration (decreased renal blood flow).
  • Anuria means urinary output < 100 ml/24 hours or complete cessation of urine output. It occurs in acute tubular necrosis (e.g. in shock, hemolytic transfusion reaction), acute glomerulonephritis, and complete urinary tract obstruction.
 
COLOR
 
Normal urine color in a fresh state is pale yellow or amber and is due to the presence of various pigments collectively called urochrome. Depending on the state of hydration urine may normally be colorless (over hydration) or dark yellow (dehydration). Some of the abnormal colors with associated conditions are listed in Table 819.1.
 
Table 819.1 Different colors of urine
Colors Conditions
Colorless Dilute urine (diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, overhydration)
Red Hematuria, Hemoglobinuria, Porphyria, Myoglobinuria
Dark brown or black Alkaptonuria, Melanoma
Brown Hemoglobinuria
Yellow Concentrated urine
Yellow-green or green Biliverdin
Deep yellow with yellow foam Bilirubin
Orange or orange-brown Urobilinogen/Porphobilinogen
Milky-white Chyluria
Red or orange fluorescence with UV light Porphyria
Note: Many drugs cause changes in urine color; drug history should be obtained if there is abnormal coloration of urine
 
APPEARANCE
 
Normal, freshly voided urine is clear in appearance. Causes of cloudy or turbid urine are listed in Table 819.2. Foamy urine occurs in the presence of excess proteins or bilirubin.
 
Table 819.2 Causes of cloudy or turbid urine
Cause Appearance Diagnosis
1. Amorphous phosphates White and cloudy on standing in alkaline urine Disappear on addition of a drop of dilute acetic acid
2. Amorphous urates Pink and cloudy in acid urine Dissolve on warming
3. Pus cells Varying grades of turbidity Microscopy
4. Bacteria Uniformly cloudy; do not settle at the bottom following centrifugation Microscopy, Nitrite test
 
ODOR
 
Freshly voided urine has a typical aromatic odor due to volatile organic acids. After standing, urine develops ammoniacal odor (formation of ammonia occurs when urea is decomposed by bacteria). Some abnormal odors with associated conditions are:
 
  • Fruity: Ketoacidosis, starvation
  • Mousy or musty: Phenylketonuria
  • Fishy: Urinary tract infection with Proteus, tyrosinaemia.
  • Ammoniacal: Urinary tract infection with Escherichia coli, old standing urine.
  • Foul: Urinary tract infection
  • Sulfurous: Cystinuria.
 
SPECIFIC GRAVITY (SG)
 
This is also called as relative mass density. It depends on amount of solutes in solution. It is basically a comparison of density of urine against the density of distilled water at a particular temperature. Specific gravity of distilled water is 1.000. Normal SG of urine is 1.003 to 1.030 and depends on the state of hydration. SG of normal urine is mainly related to urea and sodium. SG increases as solute concentration increases and decreases when temperature rises (since volume expands with rise in temperature).
 
SG of urine is a measure of concentrating ability of kidneys and is determined to get information about this tubular function. SG, however, is affected by proteinuria and glycosuria.
 
Causes of increase in SG of urine are diabetes mellitus (glycosuria), nephrotic syndrome (proteinuria), fever, and dehydration.
 
Causes of decrease in SG of urine are diabetes insipidus (SG consistently between 1.002-1.003), chronic renal failure (low and fixed SG at 1.010 due to loss of concentrating ability of tubules) and compulsive water drinking.
 
Methods for measuring SG are urinometer method, refractometer method, and reagent strip method.

1. Urinometer method: This method is based on the principle of buoyancy (i.e. the ability of a fluid to exert an upward thrust on a body placed in it). Urinometer (a hydrometer) is placed in a container filled with urine (Figure 819.1A). When solute concentration is high, upthrust of solution increases and urinometer is pushed up (high SG). If solute concentration is low, urinometer sinks further into the urine (low SG).
 
Figure 819.1 A. Urinometer method and B. Reagent strip method for measuring specific gravity of urine
Figure 819.1 (A) Urinometer method and (B) Reagent strip method for measuring specific gravity of urine
 
Accuracy of a urinometer needs to be checked with distilled water. In distilled water, urinometer should show SG of 1.000 at the temperature of calibration. If not, then the difference needs to be adjusted in test readings taken subsequently.
 
The method is as follows:
 
  1. Fill a measuring cylinder with 50 ml of urine.
  2. Lower urinometer gently into the urine and let it float freely.
  3. Let urinometer settle; it should not touch the sides or bottom of the cylinder.
  4. Take the reading of SG on the scale (lowest point of meniscus) at the surface of the urine.
  5. Take out the urinometer and immediately note the temperature of urine with a thermometer.
 
Correction for temperature: Density of urine increases at low temperature and decreases at higher temperature. This causes false reading of SG. Therefore, SG is corrected for difference between urine temperature and calibration temperature. Check the temperature of calibration of the urinometer To get the corrected SG, add 0.001 to the reading for every 3°C that the urine temperature is above the temperature of calibration. Similarly subtract 0.001 from the reading for every 3°C below the calibration temperature.
 
Correction for dilution: If quantity of urine is not sufficient for measurement of SG, urine can be appropriately diluted and the last two figures of SG are multiplied by the dilution factor.
 
Correction for abnormal solute concentration: High SG in the presence of glycosuria or proteinuria will not reflect true kidney function (concentrating ability). Therefore it is necessary to nullify the effect of glucose or proteins. For this, 0.003 is subtracted from temperature-corrected SG for each 1 gm of protein/dl urine and 0.004 for every 1 gm of glucose/dl urine.
 
2. Refractometer method: SG can be precisely determined by a refractometer, which measures the refractive index of the total soluble solids. Higher the concentration of total dissolved solids, higher the refractive index. Extent of refraction of a beam of light passed through urine is a measure of solute concentration, and thus of SG. The method is simple and requires only 1-2 drops of urine. Result is read from a scale or from digital display.
 
3. Reagent strip method: Reagent strip (Figure 819.1B) measures the concentration of ions in urine, which correlates with SG. Depending on the ionic strength of urine, a polyelectrolyte will ionize in proportion. This causes a change in color of pH indicator (bromothymol blue). Also read: URINE STRIP TEST — UNDERSTANDING ITS LIMITATIONS.
 
REACTION AND pH
 
The pH is the scale for measuring acidity or alkalinity (acid if pH is < 7.0; alkaline if pH is > 7.0; neutral if pH is 7.0). On standing, urine becomes alkaline because of loss of carbon dioxide and production of ammonia from urea. Therefore, for correct estimation of pH, fresh urine should be examined.
 
There are various methods for determination of reaction of urine: litmus paper, pH indicator paper, pH meter, and reagent strip tests.
 
  1. Litmus paper test: A small strip of litmus paper is dipped in urine and any color change is noted. If blue litmus paper turns red, it indicates acid urine. If red paper turns blue, it indicates alkaline urine (Figure 819.2A).
  2. pH indicator paper: Reagent area (which is impregnated with bromothymol blue and methyl red) of indicator paper strip is dipped in urine sample and the color change is compared with the color guide provided. Approximate pH is obtained.
  3. pH meter: An electrode of pH meter is dipped in urine sample and pH is read off directly from the digital display. It is used if exact pH is required.
  4. Reagent strip test: The test area (Figure 819.2B) contains polyionic polymer bound to H+; on reaction with cations in urine, H+ is released causing change in color of the pH-sensitive dye. Also read: URINE STRIP TEST — UNDERSTANDING ITS LIMITATIONS.
 
Figure 819.2 A. Testing pH of urine with litmus paper and B. with reagent strip test
Figure 819.2 Testing pH of urine with litmus paper (A) and with reagent strip test (B)
 
Normal pH range is 4.6 to 8.0 (average 6.0 or slightly acidic). Urine pH depends on diet, acid base balance, water balance, and renal tubular function.
 
Acidic urine is found in ketosis (diabetes mellitus, starvation, fever), urinary tract infection by Escherichia coli, and high protein diet. Alkaline urine may result from urinary tract infection by bacteria that split urea to ammonia (Proteus or Pseudomonas), severe vomiting, vegetarian diet, old ammoniacal urine sample and chronic renal failure.
 
Determining pH of urine helps in identifying various crystals in urine. Altering pH of urine may be useful in treatment of renal calculi (i.e. some stones form only in acid urine e.g. uric acid calculi; in such cases urine is kept alkaline); urinary tract infection (urine should be kept acid); and treatment with certain drugs (e.g. streptomycin is effective in urinary tract infection if urine is kept alkaline). In unexplained metabolic acidosis, measurement of urine pH is helpful in diagnosing renal tubular acidosis; in renal tubular acidosis, urine pH is consistently alkaline despite metabolic acidosis.

TEST FOR DETECTION OF UROBILINOGEN IN URINE

Published in Clinical Pathology
Saturday, 05 August 2017 15:23
Fresh urine sample should be used because on standing urobilinogen is converted to urobilin, which cannot be detected by routine tests. A timed (2-hour postprandial) sample can also be used for testing urobilinogen.
 
Methods for detection of increased amounts of urobilinogen in urine are Ehrlich’s aldehyde test and reagent strip test.
 
1. EHRLICH’S ALDEHYDE TEST
 
Ehrlich’s reagent (pdimethylaminobenzaldehyde) reacts with urobilinogen in urine to produce a pink color. Intensity of color developed depends on the amount of urobilinogen present. Presence of bilirubin interferes with the reaction, and therefore if present, should be removed. For this, equal volumes of urine and 10% barium chloride are mixed and then filtered. Test for urobilinogen is carried out on the filtrate. However, similar reaction is produced by porphobilinogen (a substance excreted in urine in patients of porphyria).
 
Fig. 818.1 Ehrlichs aldehyde test for urobilinogen
Figure 818.1 Ehrlich’s aldehyde test for urobilinogen
 
Method: Take 5 ml of fresh urine in a test tube. Add 0.5 ml of Ehrlich’s aldehyde reagent (which consists of hydrochloric acid 20 ml, distilled water 80 ml, and paradimethylaminobenzaldehyde 2 gm). Allow to stand at room temperature for 5 minutes. Development of pink color indicates normal amount of urobilinogen. Darkred color means increased amount of urobilinogen (Figure 818.1).
 
Since both urobilinogen and porphobilinogen produce similar reaction, further testing is required to distinguish between the two. For this, Watson-Schwartz test is used. Add 1-2 ml of chloroform, shake for 2 minutes and allow to stand. Pink color in the chloroform layer indicates presence of urobilinogen, while pink coloration of aqueous portion indicates presence of porphobilinogen. Pink layer is then decanted and shaken with butanol. A pink color in the aqueous layer indicates porphobilinogen (Figure 818.2).
 
Figure 818.2 Interpretation of Watson Schwartz test
Figure 818.2 Interpretation of Watson-Schwartz test
 
False-negative reaction can occur in the presence of (i) urinary tract infection (nitrites oxidize urobilinogen to urobilin), and (ii) antibiotic therapy (gut bacteria which produce urobilinogen are destroyed).
 
2. REAGENT STRIP METHOD
 
This method is specific for urobilinogen. Test area is impregnated with either p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde or 4-methoxybenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate. Also read: URINE STRIP TEST — UNDERSTANDING ITS LIMITATIONS.

PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN ANALYSIS

Published in Hemotology
Thursday, 03 August 2017 16:55
This is done by flow cytometric analysis for detection of lack of GpIb/IX in Bernanrd Soulier syndrome (deficiency of CD42), and lack of GpIIb/IIIa in Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia (deficiency of CD41, CD61).
 
What is the best protocol for platelet glycoprotein (GPIIb/IIIa) analysis using flow cytometry?
 
Fresh platelets should always be used. Storing platelets dramatically changes the level of transmembrane proteins. The best way is to follow one of standardized protocols defined in: Immunophenotypic analysis of platelets. Krueger LA, Barnard MR, Frelinger AL 3rd, Furman MI, Michelson AD.Curr Protoc Cytom. 2002 Feb;Chapter 6:Unit 6.10

TEST FOR D-DIMER

Published in Hemotology
Thursday, 03 August 2017 16:33
D-dimer is derived from the breakdown of fibrin by plasmin and D-dimer test is used to evaluate fibrin degradation. Blood sample can be either serum or plasma. Latex or polystyrene microparticles coated with monoclonal antibody to D-dimer are mixed with patient’s sample and observed for microparticle agglutination. As the particle is small, turbidometric endpoint can be determined in automated instruments. D-dimer and FDPs are raised in disseminated intravascular coagulation, intravascular thrombosis (myocardial infarction, stroke, venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism), and during postoperative period or following trauma. D-dimer test is commonly used for exclusion of thrombosis and thrombotic tendencies.
 
Further Reading:
 

TEST FOR FIBRINOGEN/FIBRIN DEGRADATION PRODUCTS (FDPs)

Published in Hemotology
Thursday, 03 August 2017 13:02
FDPs are fragments produced by proteolytic digestion of fibrinogen or fibrin by plasmin. For determination of FDPs, blood is collected in a tube containing thrombin (to remove all fibrinogen by converting it into a clot) and soybean trypsin inhibitor (to inhibit plasmin and thus prevent in vitro breakdown of fibrin). A suspension of latex particles linked to antifibrinogen antibodies (or fragments D and E) is mixed with dilutions of patient’s serum on a glass slide. If FDPs are present, agglutination of latex particles occurs (see Figure 814.1). The highest dilution of serum at which agglutination is detected is used to determine concentration of FDPs. Increased levels of FDPs occur in fibrinogenolysis or fibrinolysis. This occurs in disseminated intravascular coagulation, deep venous thrombosis, severe pneumonia, and recent myocardial infarction.

PARAMETERS MEASURED BY HEMATOLOGY ANALYZERS

Published in Hemotology
Saturday, 29 July 2017 17:54
Parameters measured by hematology analyzers and their derivation are shown in Tables 808.1 and 808.2. Most automated hematology analyzers measure red cell count, red cell indices (mean cell volume, mean cell hemoglobin, mean cell hemoglobin concentration), hemoglobin, hematocrit, total leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count (three-part or five-part), and platelet count.
 
Table 808.1 Parameters measured by hematology analyzers
Parameters measured by most analyzers Parameters measured by some analyzers
  • RBC count
  • Hemoglobin
  • Mean cell volume
  • Mean cell hemoglobin
  • Mean cell hemoglobin concentration
  • WBC count
  • WBC differential
  • Platelet count
  • Red cell distribution width
  • Reticulocyte count
  • Reticulocyte hemoglobin content
  • Mean platelet volume
  • Platelet distribution width
  • Reticulated platelets
 
Table 808.2 Parameters reported by hematology analyzers
Parameters measured directly or derived through histogram Parameters measured through calculation
  • RBC count
  • Mean cell volume (Derived from RBC histogram)
  • Red cell distribution width (Derived from RBC histogram)
  • Hemoglobin
  • Reticulocyte count
  • WBC count
  • Differential WBC count (Derived through WBC histogram)
  • Platelet count
  • Mean platelet volume (Derived from platelet histogram)
  • Hematocrit
  • Mean cell hemoglobin
  • Mean cell hemoglobin concentration
 
Estimation of Hemoglobin
 
Hemoglobin is measured directly by a modification of cyanmethemoglobin method (all hemoglobins are converted to cyanmethemoglobin by potassium ferricyanide; cyanmethemoglobin has a broad absorbance peak at 540 nm). Some analyzers use a nonhazardous reagent such as sodium lauryl sulphate. A non-ionic detergent is added for rapid red cell lysis and to minimize turbidity caused by cell membranes and plasma lipids.
 
Estimation of Red Blood Cell Count and Mean Cell Volume (MCV)
 
Red cell count and cell volume are directly measured by aperture impedance or light scatter analysis. In a red cell histogram, cell numbers are plotted on Y-axis, while cell volume is indicated on Xaxis (see Figure 808.1). The analyzer counts those cells as red cells volume of which ranges between 36 fl and 360 fl. MCV is used for morphological classification of anemia into microcytic, macrocytic, and normocytic types.
 
Figure 808.1 Diagrammatic representation of red cell histogram obtained by aperture impedance
Figure 808.1 Diagrammatic representation of red cell histogram obtained by aperture impedance. The analyzer counts cells between 36 fl and 360 fl as red cells. Although leukocytes are present and counted along with red cells in the diluting fluid, their number is not statistically significant. Only if leukocyte count is markedly elevated (>50,000/μl), histogram and the red cell count will be affected. Area of the peak between 60 fl and 125 fl is used for calculation of mean cell volume and red cell distribution width. Abnormalities in red cell histogram include: (1) Left shift of the curve in microcytosis, (2) Right shift of the curve in macrocytosis, and (3) Bimodal peak of the curve in double (dimorphic) population of red cells
 
Estimation of MCH, MCHC, and Hematocrit (HCT/PCV)
 
These parameters are obtained indirectly through calculations.
 
 
MCH (pg) = Hemoglobin (g/l)
                     RBC count (10⁶/μl)
 
 
MCHC (g/dl) = Hemoglobin (g/dl)
                         Hematocrit (%)
 
 
Hematocrit (%) = Mean Cell Volume (fl)
                              RBC count (10⁶/μl)
 
 
Estimation of Red Cell Distribution Width (RDW)
 
RDW is a quantitative measure of variation in sizes of red cells and is expressed as coefficient of variation of red cell size distribution. It is equivalent to anisocytosis observed on blood smear. It is derived from red cell histogram in some analyzers. RDW is usually elevated in iron deficiency anemia, but not in β-thalassemia minor and anemia of chronic disease (other causes of microcytic anemia). However, this distinction is not absolute and there is a significant overlap between values among patients. Raised RDW requires examination of blood smear.
 
Among the red cell values generated by the analyzer (red cell count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCV, MCH, MCHC, and RDW), most important for decision-making are hemoglobin, hematocrit, and MCV.
 
WBC Differential
 
Difference between 3-part and 5-part hemotology analyzer...
 
Hematology analyzers can either generate a 3-part differential (differential count reported as lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes) or a 5-part differential (lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils). The 3-part differential counting is based on electrical impedance volume measurement of leukocytes. In volume histogram for WBCs, approximate numbers of cells are plotted on Y-axis and cell size on X-axis. Those cells with volume 35-90 fl are designated as lymphocytes, cells with volume 90-160 fl as mononuclear cells, and cells with volume 160-450 fl as neutrophils (see Figure 808.2). Any deviation from the expected histogram is flagged by the analyzer, mandating review of blood smear. A large proportion of 3-part differential counts are ‘flagged’ to avoid missing abnormal cells.
 
Instruments measuring a 5-part differential work on a combination of different principles, e.g. light scatter, impedance, and electrical conductivity, a combination of light scatter, peroxidase staining, and resistance of basophils to lysis in acid buffer, etc.
 
Figure 808.2 Diagrammatic representation of WBC histogram
Figure 808.2 Diagrammatic representation of WBC histogram. WBC histogram analysis shows relative numbers of cells on Y-axis and cell size on X-axis. The lytic agent lyses the cytoplasm that collapses around the nucleus causing differential shrinkage. The analyzer sorts the WBCs according to the nuclear size into 3 main groups (3-part differential): Cells with 35-90 fl volume are designated as lymphocytes, cells with 90-160 fl volume are designated as monocytes, and cells with 160-450 fl volume are designated as neutrophils. Abnormalities in WBC histogram include: (1) Peak to the left of lymphocyte peak: Nucleated red cells, (2) Peak between lymphocytes and monocytes: Blast cells, eosinophilia, basophilia, plasma cells, and atypical lymphocytes, and (3) Peak between monocytes and neutrophils: Left shift
 
Platelet Count
 
Platelets are difficult to count because of their small size, marked variation in size, tendency to aggregation, and overlapping of size with microcytic red cells, cellular fragments, and other debris. In hematology analyzers, this difficulty is addressed by mathematical analysis of platelet volume distribution so that it corresponds to lognormal distribution. Platelets are counted by electrical impedance method in the RBC aperture, and a histogram is generated with platelet volume on X-axis and relative cell frequency on Y-axis (see Figure 808.3). Normal platelet histogram consists of a right-skewed single peak. Particles greater than 2 fl and less than 20 fl are classified as platelets by the analyzer.
 
Figure 808.3 Diagrammatic representation of normal platelet histogram
Figure 808.3 Diagrammatic representation of normal platelet histogram: Counting and sizing of platelets by electrical impedance method occurs in the RBC aperture. The counter designates particles between sizes 2 fl and 20 fl as platelets. Abnormalities in platelet histogram result from interferences such as cytoplasmic fragments (peak at left end of histogram) or severely microcytic red cells and giant platelets (peak at right end of histogram)
 
Two other platelet parameters can be obtained from platelet histogram using computer technology: mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW). Some analyzers can generate another parameter called as reticulated platelets.
 
MPV refers to the average size of platelets and is obtained from mathematical calculation. Normal MPV is 7-10 fl. Increased MPV (> 10 fl) results from presence of immature platelets in circulation; peripheral destruction of platelets stimulates megakaryocytes to produce such platelets (e.g. in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura). Decreased MPV (< 7 fl) is due to presence of small platelets in circulation (in conditions associated with reduced production of platelets in bone marrow).
 
PDW is analogous to RDW and is a measure of variation in size of platelets (normal <20%). Increased PDW is observed in megaloblastic anemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and after chemotherapy.
 
Some analyzers measure reticulated platelets or young platelets that contain RNA (similar to reticulocytes). Increased numbers of reticulated platelets are seen in thrombocytopenia due to peripheral destruction of platelets.

Reticulocyte Count
 
Various fluorescent dyes can combine with RNA of reticulocytes; the fluorescence then is counted in a flow cytometer. More immature reticulocytes fluoresce more strongly as they contain more RNA.
 
Reticulocyte hemoglobin content is a parameter that estimates hemoglobinization of most recently produced red cells. It is a predictor of iron deficiency.
 
WBC Cytogram (Scattergram)
 
In the scattergram, each dot represents a cell of a given volume and density, and the positions of dots in the graph are determined by the degree of side scatter, degree of forward scatter, light absorption by the cell, and cytochemical staining (if used). The forward angle light scatter (FALS) is represented on Y-axis, and the side scatter (SS) is represented on X-axis. Low FALS and low SS are indicative of lymphocytes; with subsequent increasing FALS and SS, monocytes, neutrophils, and lastly eosinophils are designated in the graph. Counting of basophils is based on a different technology.
 
Further Reading:
 

COMMON APPLICATIONS OF FLOW CYTOMETRY IN HEMATOLOGY

Published in Hemotology
Friday, 28 July 2017 17:59
  1. Leukemias and lympomas: Immunophenotyping (evaluation of cell surface markers), diagnosis, detection of minimal residual disease, and to identify prognostically important subgroups.
  2. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: Deficiency of CD 55 and CD 59.
  3. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Enumeration of CD34+ stem cells.
  4. Feto-maternal hemorrhage: Detection and quantitation of foetal hemoglobin in maternal blood sample.
  5. Anemias: Reticulocyte count.
  6. Human immunodeficiency virus infection: For enumeration of CD4+ lymphocytes.
  7. Histocompatibility cross matching.

PLATELET AGGREGATION STUDIES

Published in Hemotology
Friday, 28 July 2017 10:05
Platelet aggregation tests are carried out in specialized hematology laboratories if platelet dysfunction is suspected. These tests are usually indicated in patients presenting with mucocutaneous type of bleeding and in whom screening tests reveal normal platelet count, prolonged bleeding time, normal prothrombin time, and normal activated partial thromboplastin time. Platelet aggregation studies are carried out on platelet-rich plasma using aggregometer. When a platelet aggregating agent is added to platelet-rich plasma, platelets form aggregates and optical density falls (or light transmission increases); this is recorded by a chart recorder on a strip chart. Commonly used platelet aggregating agents are ADP (adenosine 5-diphosphate), epinephrine (adrenaline), collagen, arachidonic acid, and ristocetin. ADP (low dose) and epinephrine induce primary and secondary waves of aggregation (biphasic curve). Primary wave is due to the direct action of aggregating agent on platelets. Secondary wave is due to thromboxane A2 synthesis and secretion from platelets. Collagen, arachidonic acid and ristocetin induce a single wave of aggregation (monophasic curve) Normal aggregation curve is shown in Figure 804.1. Aggregation patterns in various platelet function defects are shown in Figures 804.2 to 804.4, and in Table 804.1.
 
Figure 804.1 Normal platelet aggregation curves
Figure 804.1 Normal platelet aggregation curves
 
Figure 804.2 Platelet aggregation curves in von Willebrand disease and Bernard Soulier syndrome absent aggregation with ristocetin normal aggregation with ADP epinephrine and arachidonic acid
Figure 804.2 Platelet aggregation curves in von Willebrand disease and Bernard-Soulier syndrome (absent aggregation with ristocetin, normal aggregation with ADP, epinephrine, and arachidonic acid)
 
Figure 804.3 Platelet aggregation curves in storage pool defect absent second wave of aggregation with ADP and epinephrine absent or greatly diminished aggregation with collagen and normal ristocetin aggregation
Figure 804.3 Platelet aggregation curves in storage pool defect (absent second wave of aggregation with ADP and epinephrine, absent or greatly diminished aggregation with collagen, and normal ristocetin aggregation)
 
Figure 804.4 Platelet aggregation curves in Glanzmanns thrombasthenia absent aggregation with all agonists except ristocetin
Figure 804.4 Platelet aggregation curves in Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia (absent aggregation with all agonists except ristocetin)

EXAMINATION OF BLOOD SMEAR

Published in Hemotology
Thursday, 27 July 2017 11:22
A blood smear is examined for:
 
 
A peripheral blood smear has three parts: Head, body, and tail. Also read: PREPARATION OF BLOOD SMEAR BY WEDGE METHOD.
 
A blood smear should be examined in an orderly manner. Initially, blood smear should be observed under low power objective (10×) to assess whether the film is properly spread and stained, to assess cell distribution, and to select an area for examination of blood cells. Best morphologic details are seen in the area where red cells are just touching one another. Low power view is also helpful for the identification of Rouleaux formation, autoagglutination of red cells, and microfilaria. High power objective (45×) is suitable for examination of red cell morphology and for differential leukocyte count. A rough estimate of total leukocyte count can be obtained which also serves to crosscheck the total leukocyte count done by manual counting or automated method. Oil-immersion objective (100×) is used for more detailed examination of any abnormal cells.
 
Further Reading:
 

MORPHOLOGY OF PLATELETS

Published in Hemotology
Wednesday, 26 July 2017 17:45
Box 802.1 Role of blood smear in thrombocytopeniaPlatelets are small, 1-3 μm in diameter, purple structures with tiny irregular projections on surface. In blood films prepared from non-anticoagulated blood (i.e. direct fingerstick), they occur in clumps. If platelet count is done on automated blood cell counters using EDTA-anticoagulated blood sample, about 1% of persons show falsely low count due to the presence in them of EDTA dependent antiplatelet antibody. Examination of a parallel blood film is useful in avoiding the false diagnosis of thrombocytopenia in such cases. Occasionally, platelets show rosetting around neutrophils (platelet satellitism) (see Figure 802.1). This is seen in patients with platelet antibodies and in apparently normal persons. Blood smear examination can be helpful in determining underlying cause of thrombocytopenia such as leukemia, lymphoma, or microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (Box 802.1).
 
Also Read:
 
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